Archive for the ‘Soup / Stew’ Category

Thai Venison Curry

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Thai Venison Curry

Thai Venison Curry
 
Author:

Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Asian, Thai
Serves: 6
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:

 
Strips of whitetail venison stew meat with fresh green beans and red bell peppers in a peanut curry sauce
Ingredients
  • 1 lb. Michigan Whitetail venison stew meat, sliced into strips ⅓” thick
  • 1 lb. fresh green beans, rough chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, rough chopped
  • 1 large white onion, chopped
  • 2 Tbs. vegetable oil
  • 1 can (14oz.) coconut milk, unsweetened
  • 1 c. chicken stock, unsalted
  • ⅓ c. peanut butter
  • 2 Tbs. fresh lime juice
  • 1 Tbs. red curry paste
  • 1 Tbs. fish sauce
  • 1 Tbs. brown sugar
  • 1 Tbs. ground coriander
  • Salt, pepper, and garlic powder to taste
  • Green onions and fresh cilantro for garnish
  • Steamed basmati rice for serving

Instructions
  1. Pour oil into large saute pan and bring to high heat. Meanwhile, make sure venison is as dry as possible by patting with paper towels. Season venison with salt, pepper, and garlic powder, as desired. In a mixing bowl, whisk together coconut milk, chicken stock, peanut butter, lime juice, curry paste, fish sauce, brown sugar, and coriander. When oil is shining, add venison and sear on all sides. Once venison is seared, add onion, beans, and red bell pepper, tossing together for 2 minutes. Add curry sauce mixture and simmer, uncovered, for 20 minutes before serving.
  2. Serve over steamed basmati rice, and garnish with green onion and cilantro.

Notes
This recipe is for a mild curry. If you would like more spice, add another Tablespoon of curry paste to your recipe!

Another great garnish for this dish would be roasted salted peanuts, chopped into little pieces to add a little extra crunch!

 

 

 

Whitetail Venison & Lentil Stew

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Talk about a nutritional powerhouse: incredibly dense in protein, fiber, B vitamins, and other minerals – while being low in fat and calories! Add a burst of flavor from our MVC Original Spice Blend and a couple splashes of red wine… This meal is perfect for these cold winter nights!

Whitetail Venison & Lentil Stew
 
Author:

Recipe type: Dinner
Serves: 6-8
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:

 
Talk about a nutritional powerhouse: incredibly dense in protein, fiber, B vitamins, and other minerals – while being low in fat and calories! Add a burst of flavor from our MVC Original Spice Blend and a couple splashes of red wine… This meal is perfect for cold winter nights!
Ingredients
  • 2 lbs. Whitetail venison stew meat
  • 2 Tbs. Michigan Venison Company Original Spice Blend
  • 1 Tbs. butter
  • 1 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Tbs. tomato paste
  • 1 large white onion, diced
  • 3 large carrots, sliced
  • 3 large stalks celery, sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ c. dry red wine
  • 2 (14oz.) cans fire roasted diced tomatoes, in juice
  • 64 oz. beef broth
  • 2 c. lentils

Instructions
  1. Combine butter and oil in large pot over medium-high heat. Season venison with spice blend and add to pot. Caramelize all sides of stew meat, remove from pot, and set aside. Add onion, celery, carrot, and garlic to pot. Saute vegetables. Return venison to pot. Add tomato paste and red wine, stirring for about 1 minute. Add canned tomatoes and broth. Cover and simmer until meat is tender, about 1 hour. Add lentils and simmer, covered, until lentils are softened, about 45 minutes.

Notes
We completed our meal with a warm slice of feta & spinach bread, a side salad, and a glass of dry red wine (a couple splashes for the recipe, a couple splashes for the chef)!

Venison Lentil Stew

 

 

Nawlins-Style Venison Gumbo

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Nawlins-Style Venison Gumbo

We hope everyone had a delicious Fat Tuesday this week! We wanted to share our latest test recipe as we gave a shout-out to America’s hometown for Mardi Gras. The aromas from the combination of slow cooking meat, seafood, and spices had our mouths watering hours before we got to dig in. With one little tweak to the recipe that you’ll see in our ‘Photos and Feedback’ section below, we know we won’t be waiting for next year’s Mardi Gras to enjoy this again. Bon Appétit!

Ingredients

  • 2 lb. venison stew meat
  • 1 lb. venison sausage, Italian sausage optional (we used leftover venison bratwursts from last weekend’s Traverse City Winter Microbrew and Music Festival)
  • 1 (16oz) bag frozen okra
  • 1 (15oz) can tomatoes, crushed or diced
  • 1 (14oz) can beef broth
  • 1 (6oz) can oysters, shrimp optional
  • 1 (4oz) can green chili peppers, mild or hot
  • 2 cans water
  • 1/2 c. clam juice (you can buy this bottled)
  • 1 medium white onion, diced
  • 4-5 green onions, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 3-4 garlic cloves, diced
  • 2 Tbs. parsley
  • 2 tsp. chili powder
  • 1 tsp. each: basil, chives, ground mustard, and Italian seasoning
  • 1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper

Instructions

Brown sausage in a skillet and drain. In a 6-quart slow cooker, add stew meat, sausage, and all other ingredients. Cook on high 5-6 hours. Serve over your choice of rice or other grain (we chose brown rice). Add hot sauce or hot pepper flakes for more kick.

Photos and Feedback:

This meal was a crowd pleaser: lean protein made tender by stewing, lots of veggies, and bold flavor without being too spicy. However, we did think the broth was a little thin. Next time we would want to add some kind of thickening agent like cornstarch. Any suggestions? We’d love to hear.

Spices and fresh produce for gumbo

Raw ingredients all coming together (missing from photo: okra and two cans water)

Finished product didn’t stick around too long

Venison Broth

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The holidays are upon us! Up here in northern Michigan, that means bundling up and heading outdoors to enjoy all the activities that winter has to offer: skiing and sledding down the slopes, trekking through the woods on snowshoe or crosscountry ski, and catching snowflakes on your tongue while you build a snowman. After a day of cold-weather adventures, what sounds better than a hot bowl of soup?

There are endless possibilities for using this broth to make a delicious soup that will warm you from the inside out. Let us know what you think!

Ingredients

  • 4 lbs venison bones (ideally with a little meat left on)
  • 3-4 Tbs olive oil
  • sea salt
  • 3 large carrots, chopped
  • 3 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 1 Tbs juniper berries
  • 2 Tbs fresh rosemary
  • 1 Tbs dried thyme
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1 Tbs black pepper

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Coat bones with olive oil and sprinkle generously with salt. Roast bones until brown, about one hour. Place bones in large stockpot or crockpot, cover with water and simmer for 2-3 hours, skimming froth off of the surface.

Place the following ingredients in cheesecloth and tie closed with string: garlic, juniper berries, rosemary, thyme, bay leaves, and black pepper. Add this satchel to water with carrot, celery, and onion. Simmer for another 2 hours.

Strain broth. We recommend starting with tongs to remove bones, vegetables, and cheesecloth satchel. Pour broth through cheesecloth or a fine strainer to remove as many pieces as possible.

Photos and Feedback:

We used a crockpot this time around, and think it came out well. If you go that route, remember to make sure that there is nothing between the lid and the top of the pot! At first we kept the string of the satchel hanging over the side, then realized that the broth wasn’t simmering as hot as we expected.

This recipe renders a generous amount, so feel free to put any extra broth in jars to save for later. Our batch never made it to the fridge, let alone the freezer – we transferred the broth to a big soup pot, added some fresh celery, carrots, bok choy, and leftover meat, and served it up family style. Multiple servings were had by all! Enjoy!

Roast venison bones until they are brown, about an hour.

Place all spices in a cheesecloth satchel closed with string.

 

Strain broth first with tongs, then through cheesecloth or a strainer.